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  #1  
Old 11-19-2017, 01:22 PM
sc204 sc204 is offline
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Increase model size

Is there a way to double or triple the plane size without affecting the physics?
I seem to remember being able to do this in a prior version.

Now if I increase the visual size of the plane it just floats around. Changing the physics percentage doesn't fix it either.

I was hoping to try this method with the oculus rift as the lower resolution makes flying the standard size plane at a distance very difficult.
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  #2  
Old 11-19-2017, 06:18 PM
Color40 Color40 is offline
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Great question. I too would like to know
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  #3  
Old 11-19-2017, 10:44 PM
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csgill75 csgill75 is online now
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You can easily adjust both physics and visual models to almost any size you want, in the editor. Unfortunately for it to fly right, you need to adjust the physics of the aircraft accordingly. It isn't a easy task to do it the right way, and a majority of people don't know how. I myself have created a couple 1/3rd scale WWI aircraft from electric stock aircraft in the sim. I had access to the real world aircraft specs including weight, measurements, power, and flight characteristics. I also had a pilot of the real aircraft to test the AV's and give proper feedback. In the End I have a couple of AV's of some real world 1/3rd scale WWI fighters that are very accurate in handling vs the real thing. This is really the only way to make large aircraft work in Realflight.

If you are trying to scale up small aircraft just to be able to see them, You can start by increasing the graphics scale first. Increasing the physics changes the way the model will fly.
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  #4  
Old 11-20-2017, 12:36 AM
adrenoline 60 adrenoline 60 is offline
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Zoom Type

Im not sure if this works with VR.
If you Change the "Zoom Type" the plane may be easier to see.
Change From: "Keep Ground In View"
To: "Auto Zoom" or "Manual".
Now You can use the +, or - to Zoom In or Out
Zoom Type, can be changed from the Main Menu: View>Zoom Type
Or by Toggling the Z key.
Note: + or - Zoom, will Not work, in "Keep Ground in View" Mode
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  #5  
Old 11-20-2017, 11:56 AM
sc204 sc204 is offline
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Zoom type is not changeable in VR. I do use auto zoom for non VR flying
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  #6  
Old 11-22-2017, 04:10 PM
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Ryan Douglas Ryan Douglas is offline
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Scaling up a vehicle is not, and cannot be, a one-step process. I can offer some additional guidance to help you along the way, though. Here's what I would do:
  1. Choose the percentage by which you want to scale the vehicle. 150%? 200%? Other?
  2. Scale the visuals to the chosen percentage. You've already done this, but for benefit of anyone else who may come along: select the Vehicle tab and adjust the value of the Vehicle Graphical Scale property.
  3. From the editor's main menu select Edit->Rescale Physics to, then select Custom (unless one of the preset values is a proper match) and punch in the desired scaling factor. That will scale a lot of the physics dimensions. The wireframe in the editor should come out generally matching the new visual size. But unfortunately it can't do everything for you.
  4. Motor: You'll need to select or--more likely--create a motor that is appropriate for the new size. Select the Physics tab, then look for something like the Airframe->Fuselage->Engine component in the left pane and select it. (The exact name and location can vary by model.) Then in the right pane, find the Torque Generator parameter and click its value. A button labeled "..." will appear on the far right side of that line. Click that to open the motor selection dialog. In there, you can copy an existing stock motor, give it a new name, and then edit its parameters.
  5. [Airplanes] Propeller: For an airplane, you'll need to adjust the prop pitch & diameter manually. With the Engine component still selected, locate and edit the Prop Pitch and Prop Diameter parameters as needed.
  6. [Helis] Main rotor blades: For a heli, you'll need to select/create appropriately sized main blades. The exact location can very by model, but you're looking for something like Airframe->Fuselage->Heli Mechanics->Main Rotor. Then in the right pane, find the Blade Type property and click its value. A button labeled "..." will appear on the far right side of that line. Click that to open the rotor blade selection dialog. In there, you can select an existing blade if any are a good match, or you can copy one of them, give it a new name, and then edit its parameters. You may also want to modify other properties like the collective and cyclic deflection angles, which are separate properties of the Main Rotor component.
  7. [Helis] Tail rotor blades: For a heli, you'll need to adjust the tail rotor blade size. Look for something like Airframe->Fuselage->Heli Mechanics->Tail Boom->Tail Rotor. With that selected in the left pane, modify the Diameter, Chord at Root, and Chord at Tip properties in the right pane as desired. You may also want to adjust the deflection angles or other properties.
  8. [Internal Combustion Engines] Fuel tank: The dimensions will adjust as part of the automatic physics scaling in step 3, but not the capacity. So select the Airframe->Main Fuel Tank component, then in the right pane edit the Fuel Tank Size parameter as desired.
  9. [Electric] Battery: The dimensions will adjust as part of the automatic physics scaling in step 3, but not the capacity. So select the Airframe->Main Battery component, then in the right pane select the Cell Type property and click its value. A button labeled "..." will appear on the far right side of the line. Click that to open the battery selection dialog. In there, you can select an existing cell type if any are a good match, or you can copy one of them, give it a new name, and then edit its parameters. Note that this represents an individual cell. This will get multiplied; you're probably not using a single-cell battery, after all. To adjust the number of these cells in series and/or parallel, edit those separate Main Battery properties.
  10. Weights: None of the weights will have been scaled. Almost every component type has a weight associated with it. For most, it will appear somewhere near the top of the list of standard parameters. In some cases it's a little more subtle, as with the Engine, where it is determined by the selected Torque Converter's Weight value. Things like onboard camera components and control surfaces do not have individual weights, and the fuel tank weight should be dry (the sim calculates the weight of the fuel dynamically based on the specified capacity, and it changes as it is consumed in flight). Note that for symmetrical components (e.g., an airplane main wing, where changes made affect both the left and right side together), the weight is for one side only, and will get doubled automatically by the sim. When in doubt, you can scroll down to the bottom for a list of Read-Only Parameters, where the current mass will be listed, along with the combined mass of both sides for symmetrical components as well as the weight including all subcomponents.
This is not guaranteed to be an exhaustive list. I may have left something out. But it should be more than enough to get you started. As csgill75 pointed out, doing this correctly is not a minor undertaking! A good simulation requires good data, so there are no real shortcuts here. Unfortunately the physics of flight don't really make it possible for the sim to automatically do all of this for you. But if you do it right you will be rewarded with something that flies very accurately.
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  #7  
Old 11-22-2017, 04:13 PM
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Ryan Douglas Ryan Douglas is offline
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As an aside, people are sometimes confused about why a model with only its visuals scaled up feels and looks wrong or "weird" in flight. To perhaps help illustrate why that is, imagine a full-scale 747 airliner that magically had the actual physical dimensions, power system, etc. of a small park flyer. Imagine that 747 flying along at, say, 30 MPH, and how that would look in the sky. It would seem to take forever just to traverse its own body length! It would still take exactly the same amount of time to go from one end of the runway to the other as the park flyer does, but it would look very unnatural doing it. It would seem to almost be floating along. A real 747 flying at that speed would drop out of the sky! Now imagine it turning around with, say, a 10 foot turning radius. It would almost appear to spin in place like a top. There's no way a 747 could turn around in that kind of space, but that's exactly what the park flyer under those magnified visuals would really be doing. It looks wrong because an artificially blown up visual model is doing things it could never do if the physics matched its size, and our brains know this.
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  #8  
Old 11-23-2017, 09:33 AM
sc204 sc204 is offline
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Thanks for the tips. I will give it another try when I have a chance.
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