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  #61  
Old 12-23-2011, 11:09 PM
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Maj. Numbskully Maj. Numbskully is offline
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I prefer the middle of the road ...a lens set to "Wide" t begins distort strait lines and can exaggerate parallax

A lens set to tele or slightly zoomed from what is considered Normal begins to compress the image .....making things further away in the back ground seem closer to an object in the fore ground than it actually is

what focal length is "normal" .... that depends on the format ( no I'm not referring to file type)

In the old days "format" referred to the size of the negative
a "normal" lens ...one that gives similar perspective as your eye (I'm not talking of field of view here) for a 35mm format camera it right around is 50mm
My medium format Hasselblad had a format or negative size of 2 1/4" x2 1/4" and it's "normal" lens was an 80mm

how are these numbers arrived @ that would take way more explanation than I planned on doing here .......basically it has to do with optics and whats known as the image circle

So to determine whats "normal" for a digital camera really depends on the size of its Image chip ...and that varies widely from camera to camera ....so there is not really a hard and fast answer to that question as there once was with film cameras
For my G9 I find , its in the middle of its zoom range


Hasselbald has/had a 2 1/4 (film) camera known as the SWc (Super Wide Camera) it has a Ziess lens that takes distortion -less pics at a normal perspective but has the same field of view as human eyes just under 180...... bonus is that it also "Sees just under 180 vertically too !....its the only camera in the world that can take a high res. wide angle distortion-less photo ..... in one shot.......... think about it ......thats a completely distortion less 360 pano in 4 shots ! if you scanned them into digital ....you could make perfect panos with any basic photo editor
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Last edited by Maj. Numbskully; 12-23-2011 at 11:19 PM.
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  #62  
Old 12-23-2011, 11:17 PM
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I've been playing around with pano's on and off for a while now. (not to successfully)

I'm sure if I took the time I'd pick pretty quick.

This is just a 360 degree horizontal shot set at 1/2 zoom. It took 12 photo's at this setting. You can see how many more it would take to make a whole sphere.

Just though people might like to see.

P.S. No Phrank, I haven't messed with the one I sent you yet. LOL.

Never enough time
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I'd like to see a 2 file per day upload limit.

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  #63  
Old 12-23-2011, 11:22 PM
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This video is a good example of my suggestions. This guy gets good results from this setup. Also he uses the Nodal Ninja. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPSJ_...eature=related
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  #64  
Old 12-23-2011, 11:24 PM
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Seems like your camera is like mine ...half way through the zoom appers to have a "normal perspective ....just because its "Zoomed" does not mean that it is actually telephoto....its just moved in from "wide"...I would stick with that setting
In the day I worried about cost of film and processing , taking Digi's is dirt cheap ....shoot away I say
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Last edited by Maj. Numbskully; 12-23-2011 at 11:28 PM.
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  #65  
Old 12-23-2011, 11:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boof69
This video is a good example of my suggestions. This guy gets good results from this setup. Also he uses the Nodal Ninja. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPSJ_...eature=related
Why isn't it that easy for me?
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  #66  
Old 12-23-2011, 11:35 PM
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He did seem to know what he was doing. I think he's been at it a while.
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  #67  
Old 12-23-2011, 11:37 PM
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Maj. Numbskully Maj. Numbskully is offline
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wait till you get the ninja ...it will be !
like I said about 6 shots for a 180

BTW ...I'd take 2 nadere shots 90 degrees of each other I'd also put a penny on the ground dead center of the tripod
so you'd have an accurate target when you move the tri-pod for those shots as well
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  #68  
Old 12-23-2011, 11:48 PM
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All good advise.
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  #69  
Old 12-24-2011, 07:51 AM
12oclockhigh 12oclockhigh is offline
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I don't bother taking the zenith and nadir shots... I just photoshop that section of the picture. You hardly ever see the feet of the pilot, and the sky is usually very easy to clone.

The number of shots is all related to the lens being used. The hardest thing to do is to get the paralex and the aperture settings right.

Once you get your camera settings correct it is pretty easy.... then the problems become the weather, wind, sun and clouds. Some days are just not good for a shoot.
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  #70  
Old 12-25-2011, 07:03 AM
12oclockhigh 12oclockhigh is offline
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obviously a serious miss-understanding of parallax... with each lens change (zooming lenses too) the len's nodal point can change. You adjust for parallax. If you don't adjust, the picture will be blurry.

See the nodal ninja website for information in adjusting for parallax that.
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  #71  
Old 12-28-2011, 09:41 AM
12oclockhigh 12oclockhigh is offline
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3D Fields

I never made any statement that this thread was photo field only... post where ever you feel comfortable. I will focus on my thread.
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  #72  
Old 12-28-2011, 11:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 12oclockhigh
obviously a serious miss-understanding of parallax... with each lens change (zooming lenses too) the len's nodal point can change. You adjust for parallax. If you don't adjust, the picture will be blurry.

See the nodal ninja website for information in adjusting for parallax that.
I'll say there is a miss understanding

Thats twice you've mentioned parallax and blurry as if one effects the other

They are 2 completely different things that have absolutely nothing to do with each other

As long as you have enough depth of field using a smaller aperture and the lens is focused properly
having the nodal point set incorrectly even after changing the lens or zoom setting will only give you parallax problems ......not blurriness
you'll still get sharp photos

Blurriness can only happen in one or more of the following situations
Slow Shutter Speed
Moving objects in the photo (relative to shutter speed)
Incorrect aperture setting
Incorrect focus setting
Camera movement/ shake
Dirty lens or film/chip plane
Dirty filter
Zooming during exposure
Panning during exposure
Extreme heat or cold
Condensation
Damaged lens
None have anything to do with the nodal point or parallax

Please post a link to the ninja site you referenced I found several and can't find anything mentioning the relation ship between the 2

I'll admit panos are not my strong point in photography
but everything I was taught tells me that parallax and image sharpness are 2 different animals
I'd like to see what the folks at nodal ninja are saying about that
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Last edited by Maj. Numbskully; 12-28-2011 at 01:49 PM.
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  #73  
Old 12-28-2011, 01:42 PM
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It's my understanding that you first set the focal length you wish to use for the shot. Then move the camera forward or back along the top rail to adjust for parallax. The method for doing so seems simple enough. I agree with Maj. that blur and parallax are two different things.
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  #74  
Old 12-28-2011, 02:02 PM
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What I want to know is how do you know when the nodal point is set correctly before you start shooting ?
As mentioned the nodal point can shift With the zoom setting and varies widely from lens to lens even ones that have the same focal length range
I would hope its not just trail and error with the ninja
once you determine where the nodal point is for a fixed focal length lens you dont really need a ninja ............you can easily make your own mount for a fraction of the cost
problem is camera and lens manufacturers dont mark where the nodal point is or even have any kind of documentation showing were it is .... at least they never used to

I saw once that theres a way to find the nodal point using a lazy Susan and some pencils I'll have to look for that again
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Last edited by Maj. Numbskully; 12-28-2011 at 02:09 PM.
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  #75  
Old 12-28-2011, 02:19 PM
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If you have an object close to the camera and one far away you can line them up on the right side of the frame. When you rotate the camera to the right they should be in the same alignment with one another. This effect can be demonstrated by holding your finger in front of you and aligning it with some vertical element like a door frame using one eye. Then turn your head from the neck you will see your finger and the door frame move in and out of alignment, but if you try to move your head around your open eye you can keep the two in alignment.
The lens you use and focal depth is set to preference first then the nodal point is found using the described method.
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