allenajs/What about when using two routers?

allenajs

New member
I have a router in my home office connected to my cable modem. From that router, I have a line to a router inside my house and computers connected to that one.
So, do I need to set up forwarding the same way on both routers?
 
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Dusty E-D

Administrator
I have two routers at home set up like this.

Internet->Router1->Router2->Computer


I had to forward the ports on router2 so that they went to my computer, and I also had to forward ports on Router1 so they went to Router2.

Hope this helps.
 

TheHeliCrasher

New member
Did you know that you can use only one router and replace it with a switch/hub instead? Usually you only need one router and use a switch/hub in place of the other to give you more ports. Then you only need to configure one router anyway.
 
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jeffpn

Well-known member
True, but a popular problem is that the modem is a router without wireless capability, so the second router covers that. Is the such a thing as a wireless switch? I've never looked into that.
 

TheHeliCrasher

New member
jeffpn said:
True, but a popular problem is that the modem is a router without wireless capability, so the second router covers that. Is the such a thing as a wireless switch? I've never looked into that.
Ahhh, I didn't think of that.. True some isp's give you a modem with router and no wireless in that. I spose a second router would be needed then if you want wireless. I haven't heard of a wireless switch myself ... yet.
 

opjose

New member
Exactly!

If your Cable modem, provides NAT/DHCP services, it is important to set a STATIC IP for the second router.

One that "lives" on the first router's network, but is "outside" the DHCP dolled out addresses...

Then you turn OFF NAT/DHCP on the second router.

Hard wire the second router/AP to the first one, and you're good to go.

The second router's AP will then dole out IP addresses by passing the DHCP request to the first router for servicing.

As far as your machines are concerned they all "live" on one big happy network.

And as an added benefit, because you no longer have to deal with two levels of IP translations, the machines connected to the second router see a DOUBLING of network performance, to match that of machines connected to the first router.
 
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