is there an age limit for learning to fly

Kha'Zix

Active member
Well then, your parents are not very smart.
I've been flying giant scale 3D for 9 years now, and I've only ever had a couple crashes that were my fault. One was me ground looping a 30cc and one was me over correcting when trying a tail dunk in a lake, and that was at least 5 years ago. The only other crashes i've had was when my receiver switch shorted out and when I had a dead stick in a low harrier. I personally think that depending on how well said kid is flying, and can fly a giant scale plane with no issues, its fine.
 

grooveybf109e

Well-known member
I've been flying giant scale 3D for 9 years now, and I've only ever had a couple crashes that were my fault. One was me ground looping a 30cc and one was me over correcting when trying a tail dunk in a lake, and that was at least 5 years ago. The only other crashes i've had was when my receiver switch shorted out and when I had a dead stick in a low harrier. I personally think that depending on how well said kid is flying, and can fly a giant scale plane with no issues, its fine.
But you don't know until you actually get out there. And SMALLER planes ARE CHEAPER. Usually.
 

12oclockhigh

Well-known member
One thing about a child is that you cannot give them everything when they want it. You have to keep things back for when they get older. A prize for doing something well. They will go through hobbies like a cat on a tin roof and then be off to the next thing. Make them earn it. If it is earned, it is appreciated.
 

grooveybf109e

Well-known member
One thing about a child is that you cannot give them everything when they want it. You have to keep things back for when they get older. A prize for doing something well. They will go through hobbies like a cat on a tin roof and then be off to the next thing. Make them earn it. If it is earned, it is appreciated.
But you don't just want to give them a receiver but no plane or tx. But I wouldn't buy a 3yo a 2.1m cub Z either. (nor myself for that matter...if I had the money) now if you are a billionaire then what is $1,000 to get the best of the hobby? But still for me if I were starting I would

1. get RealFlight and fly in chase at first just so that you can see what does what.
2. Once you crash only once every five minutes in chase go to fixed and learn to keep the plane within sight.
3.don't let your computer crash (mine did) then watch the flite test beginner series
4. Buy a plane with safe specifically a high wing.
5. Watch the beginner series again then fly!
 

uncle twist

Well-known member
Just buy RF and use it to learn the sticks and orientation and keeping the plane within sight get familiar with what it takes to fly a real world plane, simple as that, forget all the "safe" crap, you`re not going too learn how to fly a real world plane that doesn`t have it, if that`s all you use.....the whole concept is to learn to fly WHERE/WHEN YOU`RE in control of the plane, and only you NOT "safe" , THAT`S where the thrill comes from, ..you being able to say "I FLEW IT" "I DID IT" "I LANDED IT" ALL by myself.....flying chase is OK for fun...BUT, ...the best position to fly from is usually the default position, it gives you the view that you would usually experience in the real world.
 

Ghost129er

Active member
Well then, your parents are not very smart.
Why? I used to be the youngest flier on the field flying a modded .46 FX (when they used to actually be made in Japan) on a P-51 'Miss America' at around 5/6 and was previously training on RealFlight back in the days of RC Pilot and RealFlight G2 before that... I guess so long as it's supervised and everyone in the surrounding area is okay with it, that's pretty much the OK, right? We also flew in the Middle of f****** nowhere anyways, to make it safer for anyone be it pilot or citizen.

I do miss my Brightstar though... I learnt my lesson about dualrates and etc after trying and inverted loop and making a .52 Four Stroke into a Four Broke lmao.
 

uncle twist

Well-known member
The danger is always there at the flying field,... I`ve had two near misses,.......By what I thought to be (IMHO) experienced RC pilots, on one of those occasions, I stood up, and had an airplane coming at my face, I hit the dirt in a heartbeat, and was grateful I didn`t get hit by it, I had some words with the pilot, in a sort of nice way.....I don`t recall ever seeing him at the field again. My point, it really doesn`t matter the age so much, but the ability too make a decision in any given moment, no matter the age, which does take some foresight.....I have seen good young pilots at the field, and not so good ....what I thought to be "experienced" pilots.
 

Ghost129er

Active member
I have seen good young pilots at the field, and not so good ....what I thought to be "experienced" pilots.
Shame because we had to Pasta bois (Italians) who flew into a Seafury someone had built up as a kit. Least to say, that was his last day he flew an R/C aircraft here, but so much for people who 'know' how to fly or even have the most expensive aircraft at the field...

At the end of the day, if you don't know the person behind the controller, you must always be careful. Flying at that field, I keep them in my 'poor coordination/lack of communication' list and avoid flying when they fly (plenty of people in that list). If you've had experience flying with someone and know there's good communication and control, then you can feel better about it.

And even if anyone of us want to fly recklessly, be if full throttle low passes, low level flying, aerobatic, we always wait for everyone to land, stand back and then perform our 'show' or madness individually...
 

grooveybf109e

Well-known member
.the best position to fly from is usually the default position, it gives you the view that you would usually experience in the real world.
I am 14 I find it boring to fly in fixed, and 5 years ago when I first got the flight sim it was not boring it was avrigating to fly in fixed so I flew in chase then I could see pull back on the stick the elevator goes up and the plane goes up etc. We are not talking about a 25 year old It is a THREE YEAR OLD!!-if I was three I would think RC pretty lame if I only crashed--either that or who cares about money.
 

Kha'Zix

Active member
The danger is always there at the flying field,... I`ve had two near misses,.......By what I thought to be (IMHO) experienced RC pilots, on one of those occasions, I stood up, and had an airplane coming at my face, I hit the dirt in a heartbeat, and was grateful I didn`t get hit by it, I had some words with the pilot, in a sort of nice way.....I don`t recall ever seeing him at the field again. My point, it really doesn`t matter the age so much, but the ability too make a decision in any given moment, no matter the age, which does take some foresight.....I have seen good young pilots at the field, and not so good ....what I thought to be "experienced" pilots.
Exactly! I soloed when I was 4 after flying realflight g3 for a year with no issues and was able to take off, do circuits, land, and do it again with no issue. That's part of what I love about this hobby, is most anyone can get into it affordably and learn it. And going off what you're post was saying, I was flying my 1/3 scale clip wing cub at an event and felt it browning out, and I made the decision to set it down and ended having the regulators to the receiver fry. I also had a power switch fail on a 70cc aerobatic plane and had to kill the engine and jam full up elevator in hopes of regaining signal and trying to save the plane or possible a person if it turned our way
 
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