Throttle not working in Heli's

njbob

New member
I cannot get the throttle to work in any Heli I have tried. The airplanes work fine. I can see the blades move on the heli when I work the throttle. But the engine speed is not responsive. I feel like I am missing something. Thanks
 

njbob

New member
Got it

Thaks Jeff, I feel like an idiot. I swear I had tried all these switches. Was the "throttle hold" Duh. Sorry for wasting everyones time.
 

gnielsen

New member
Hi folks! I'm having this same issue, back in the hobby after many years off. I bought a NX8 transmitter and RealFlight 9.5 to brush up my skills. I was able to jump right in and fly airplane models without issues, but for some reason when I try to fly a heli I cannot get the motor to spin up even I increase the throttle, while I can see the pitch increase. I'm using the standard NX8 heli setup. BTW, in RF9.5 when I configure my controller, the throttle indicator is moving with my stick input. Also, I configured throttle hold to a 3 position switch and it also registers in the controller setup. When I toggle the switch I go from no motor to immediate 3D mode with motor that runs at fixed full speed and negative pitch. I'm puzzled, any ideas?
 

marcushh777

Well-known member
for some reason when I try to fly a heli I cannot get the motor to spin up even [if] I increase the throttle, while I can see the pitch increase.
:rolleyes:

When I toggle the switch I go from no motor to immediate 3D mode with motor that runs at fixed full speed and negative pitch. I'm puzzled
:sneaky:

In this 'baiting' I don't suppose you noticed that two of your statements are directly conflicting? You're using enough of the buzz words to indicate that you know what you're doing... yet you don't use the most obvious and necessary buzz words 'collective', nor 'idle-up'. Idle-up is a three position switch, while throttle hold is a two position switch... but you know that. Why the 'bait', and more to the point, what is your real question?

marcus
 

12oclockhigh

Well-known member
You really should have posted this in the RF9.5 forum. You dredged up a very old thread. that is OK.

It depends on the position of the B switch, 0=zero rpm zero pitch, 1=a bit <full throttle and left stick controls pitch, 2= full (programmed) throttle, and the left stick controls the blade pitch. The 2position switch controls throttle hold (rpm on or off)

This is the way most guys set up modern helicopters, the head speed is controlled by the electronic speed controller to a value the pilot selects. B Switch val=1 is usually less than the high rpm value, B Switch Val=2 is the high head speed. Of course, the pilot can set head speed to be whatever he wants but the ESC varies the current/voltage to keep the head speed.

Usually, you would start out with Throttle hold one and the B switch set to zero. Flip the throttle hold and increase the left stick collective to get the bird flying, when comfortable switch to Idleup1 (B-switch) then Idleup2 for massive air 3D maneuvers LOL. You always have to keep in mind the position of the B-switch. The second that you try inverted flight with B=0 you drop out of the sky. Bad Day indeed.

As you get used to it, you will find that you like the governed head-speed. It makes for less work on the pilot and dependable flying results. You worry less about how much power you have and concentrate on left stick to control the blade pitch and thus control lift or descent. Not so much about throttle pitch curves any more.

In the meantime, you can just fly in normal mode (unless inverted). You can even do a quick flip in normal mode, just expect the drop in head speed and get back on the throttle quickly.
 
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marcushh777

Well-known member
You really should have posted this in the RF9.5 forum. You dredged up a very old thread. that is OK.

It depends on the position of the B switch, 0=zero rpm zero pitch, 1=a bit <full throttle and left stick controls pitch, 2= full (programmed) throttle, and the left stick controls the blade pitch. The 2position switch controls throttle hold (rpm on or off)

This is the way most guys set up modern helicopters, the head speed is controlled by the electronic speed controller to a value the pilot selects. B Switch val=1 is usually less than the high rpm value, B Switch Val=2 is the high head speed. Of course, the pilot can set head speed to be whatever he wants but the ESC varies the current/voltage to keep the head speed.

Usually, you would start out with Throttle hold one and the B switch set to zero. Flip the throttle hold and increase the left stick collective to get the bird flying, when comfortable switch to Idleup1 (B-switch) then Idleup2 for massive air 3D maneuvers LOL. You always have to keep in mind the position of the B-switch. The second that you try inverted flight with B=0 you drop out of the sky. Bad Day indeed.

As you get used to it, you will find that you like the governed head-speed. It makes for less work on the pilot and dependable flying results. You worry less about how much power you have and concentrate on left stick to control the blade pitch and thus control lift or descent. Not so much about throttle pitch curves any more.

In the meantime, you can just fly in normal mode (unless inverted). You can even do a quick flip in normal mode, just expect the drop in head speed and get back on the throttle quickly.
The 'quick flip' in normal mode does not work in most of the S models. The 150 S I've been flying recently uses the @SAFE stabilization software in 'normal' mode which limits pitch and roll, so normal (scale) flying is possible without having to worry about accidental inverted flight.

marcus
 

marcushh777

Well-known member
You really should have posted this in the RF9.5 forum. You dredged up a very old thread. that is OK.

It depends on the position of the B switch, 0=zero rpm zero pitch, 1=a bit <full throttle and left stick controls pitch, 2= full (programmed) throttle, and the left stick controls the blade pitch. The 2position switch controls throttle hold (rpm on or off)

This is the way most guys set up modern helicopters, the head speed is controlled by the electronic speed controller to a value the pilot selects. B Switch val=1 is usually less than the high rpm value, B Switch Val=2 is the high head speed. Of course, the pilot can set head speed to be whatever he wants but the ESC varies the current/voltage to keep the head speed.

Usually, you would start out with Throttle hold one and the B switch set to zero. Flip the throttle hold and increase the left stick collective to get the bird flying, when comfortable switch to Idleup1 (B-switch) then Idleup2 for massive air 3D maneuvers LOL. You always have to keep in mind the position of the B-switch. The second that you try inverted flight with B=0 you drop out of the sky. Bad Day indeed.

As you get used to it, you will find that you like the governed head-speed. It makes for less work on the pilot and dependable flying results. You worry less about how much power you have and concentrate on left stick to control the blade pitch and thus control lift or descent. Not so much about throttle pitch curves any more.

In the meantime, you can just fly in normal mode (unless inverted). You can even do a quick flip in normal mode, just expect the drop in head speed and get back on the throttle quickly.
You've incorrectly stated above that its "not so much about throttle pitch curves any more". Nothing could be further from the truth. The throttle PIT curves are EVERYTHING. As you did point out you need to keep the B switch in mind... and its the B switch that selects the throttle PIT curves!

Depending on your throttle PIT curve(s) the idle-up '0' normal B position will have catastrophic results if the idle-up comes from full-back collective (negative pitch). The reason is that the blades spin up too quickly for negative pitch while sitting on the ground. In fact, some of the helis in the sim shatter on-the-ground if idle-up occurs (on the ground) from full-back collective. I have found that (depending on the throttle PIT curve) idle-up works best when dropping throttle hold with the collective just back of the half-way point; even a third of the way forward is good.

marcus
 

marcushh777

Well-known member
Obviously does not understand governor of the ESC.
E lectronic S peed C ontroller

The ESC is NOT a governor. Its a computer controlled power FET which handles the high currents used in outrunner electric motors; and also usually contains a B attery E limination C ircuit, for powering the receiver. Motor speed controllers and PITT curves are two completely different animals and do completely different things. Understanding the ESC is important (obviously) but has little to due with understanding proper idle-up sequences and the overall importance of throttle PITT curve(s).

marcus
 

marcushh777

Well-known member
Showing little knowledge of large 160 and 200amp ESCs.
My knowledge is complete, and expert. I have both designed and built these circuits, and I have written the software|firmware that controls them. I stand by my statements as 100% correct.

PS edit: you can personally attack me, or you can speak to the issue(s). You have no idea what my knowledge is; I'm willing to teach you.

marcus
 

gnielsen

New member
You really should have posted this in the RF9.5 forum. You dredged up a very old thread. that is OK.

It depends on the position of the B switch, 0=zero rpm zero pitch, 1=a bit <full throttle and left stick controls pitch, 2= full (programmed) throttle, and the left stick controls the blade pitch. The 2position switch controls throttle hold (rpm on or off)

This is the way most guys set up modern helicopters, the head speed is controlled by the electronic speed controller to a value the pilot selects. B Switch val=1 is usually less than the high rpm value, B Switch Val=2 is the high head speed. Of course, the pilot can set head speed to be whatever he wants but the ESC varies the current/voltage to keep the head speed.

Usually, you would start out with Throttle hold one and the B switch set to zero. Flip the throttle hold and increase the left stick collective to get the bird flying, when comfortable switch to Idleup1 (B-switch) then Idleup2 for massive air 3D maneuvers LOL. You always have to keep in mind the position of the B-switch. The second that you try inverted flight with B=0 you drop out of the sky. Bad Day indeed.

As you get used to it, you will find that you like the governed head-speed. It makes for less work on the pilot and dependable flying results. You worry less about how much power you have and concentrate on left stick to control the blade pitch and thus control lift or descent. Not so much about throttle pitch curves any more.

In the meantime, you can just fly in normal mode (unless inverted). You can even do a quick flip in normal mode, just expect the drop in head speed and get back on the throttle quickly.
thank you for the kind advice
 

marcushh777

Well-known member
The latest AMA 'Model Aviation' magazine has an excellent article on programming heli governor mode using motor feedback loop through the ESC; covers pitch curve(s), throttle curve(s), programming, ratings, and more.
( see pages 24-31, 04/2021 )

marcus
 
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